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Questionnaires and Experiments

It is important to be able to design simple questionnaires for the GCSE examination

Key properties

·       Keep questions simple and to the point

·       Avoid leading questions such as “do you agree…”

·       Avoid emotive language which might sway peoples’ opinions

·       Always provide clear response boxes so that the information the recipient gives is useful

Examples of good questions

1)    Rate your teacher from 1 to 5 by ticking the relevant box below, the higher the number the better

1

2

3

4

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

2)    How many days do you watch TV a week

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Poor questions

Poor Question

Reason

Do you like your teacher?

It is not obvious which teacher the question is referring to

How good is school?

There are no tick/response boxes

Do you agree that killing innocent animals is wrong?

This question is both leading and emotive (due to word innocent)

 

DATA Handling Cycle

·       Collect data to investigate an hypothesis

·       Work out an appropriate average to see whether the hypothesis is true

·       Compare the averages and make a conclusion

Example – Jack thinks boys are better than girls at maths however he thinks girls are more consistent

·       He could collect test scores from Mathematics

·       He could work out the mean score for both boys and girls in Maths. He could also work out the range

·       If the boys mean is bigger than he will deduce that boys are better. He would expect the girls to have a smaller range if they are more consistent